Tag Archives: millenials

The Most Entitled Generation Isn’t Millennials

The Most Entitled Generation Isn’t Millennials

“For the first time in America’s history, an entire generation of her citizens are poorer, more indebted, and less employed than the preceding generations.

That generation is the millennials – our generation.

The culprit, say some social commenters, are millennials themselves. In this telling, we are a lazy cohort of entitled and narcissistic brats — the proverbial Generation Me. But this is a classic case of blaming the victim.

The true cause of this unfortunate situation is clear: It’s the economy. The Great Recession stymied economic growth, halted job creation, kept older Americans in the workforce longer, and encouraged younger Americans to continue debt-financed schooling.

Moreover, the Great Recession was not merely a one-off calamity — it was a symptom of economic ills long perpetuated and ignored. And the criticism and labels that have been heaped upon millennials bear much more resemblance to the type of intergenerational stereotyping that has always existed (“darn kids these days”) than to any measurable reality.

The truth: The economic tragedy of the Millennial generation was written before many of us had even learned to read — Baby Boomer parents and grandparents who, at once, genuinely love and care for us, but have also created or perpetuated institutions, policies, and economic realities that have now hobbled us.

Our generation has been called “entitled.” We beg to differ. If any generation is entitled, it’s our parents’ and grandparents’ generation: the baby boomers.

True entitlement is tripling the national debt since the 1980s and using the proceeds to spend lavishly on tax cuts and government programs that primarily provided short-term economic boosts, while refusing to raise the Social Security age of retirement or to reduce benefits, even as the gluttonous program careens toward unsustainability.

australia2AAP Image/NEWZULU/ZOEA protester at recent Australia climate-change rallies in the lead up to the UN climate summit in New York.

True entitlement is allowing the reasonable minimum wage that Baby Boomers enjoyed when they were our age to deteriorate while opting to cut taxes on the gains from stocks and bonds that they accrued during periods of debt-driven economic and stock-market surges — creating an economy where wage earners at all income levels, as of 2012, receive a smaller portion of economic output at any time since 1929.

True entitlement is, for decades, enjoying the benefits of the lowest energy costs in the world while refusing to price-in the external costs of carbon emissions, exacerbating the real changes to our planet that pose profound risks to the environment and economy for which millennials will soon be the primary stewards.

These grave consequences were entirely foreseeable — but they happened. Young Americans have been fleeced in order to fund the transient excesses of the old — and yet millennials are labeled “entitled” because we were given “participation trophies” and “personal tutors” before we were old enough to vote … ?

Give us a break. Millennials are not entitled. But we are frustrated.

We’re frustrated, because the same baby-boomer bloc that created or tacitly perpetuated the policies that have hamstrung millennials now makes up almost a third of the American voting-aged population and holds nearly two-thirds of the seats of the US House of Representatives and Senate. This, during a decade-long span when incumbent House and Senate members are richly rewarded for being the most unproductive legislators in US history, respectively winning reelection 94% and 87% of the time.

millennials, workplaceITU/Rowan Farrell

Granted, many members of our generation need to learn how to vote every two years, not just every four. And we need to begin to fulfill the civic-minded label — “The Next Great Generation” — which social scientists have bestowed upon us. When we do begin to regularly share our opinions in the voting booth, not just on Twitter, you can be assured that we’ll act to keep this country great. We’ll make the “hard” choices the baby boomers have refused to make.

Already, we’ve learned how to be fiscally responsible — with the most student debt of any generation in history, we’ve had to. More than any other generation, we eschew expensive possessions like cars and large houses, opting instead for bikes and shared living spaces. Sure, we would like to own all that fancy stuff someday, but we realize that we can’t have everything we want.

We know that our government would be better off spending more of our tax dollars on jobs and education, and not just on Social Security and defense. We overwhelmingly recognize that the war on drugs has been an embarrassing waste of money and lives, and that anyone should be able to marry whomever they love.

Perhaps we millennials are entitled: We seemed to think that baby-boomer politicians would enact much-needed changes while we fiddled with our smartphones. We were definitely wrong on that one.”

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Grandmas Rise Up Against Millennials’ “Grandma” Lifestyle

Grandmas Rise Up Against Millennials’ “Grandma” Lifestyle

Absolutely perfect:

“…Grandparents are speaking out, disavowing any affiliation with the millennials who take daylong naps punctuated by brief scrolls through Twitter. Doris said, “It’s insulting. Today, I went to my water-aerobics class, played bridge for three hours, made progress on a Sudoku puzzle that has been stumping me for months, and tried a new recipe. Who has time to sit around like those kids, watching the Netflix all day?” Doris’s friend Maude Elser chimed in: “When my lover Hal left me for my canasta partner, I got myself a new canasta partner. I sure as heck didn’t stay inside and drink three bottles of Pinot Grigio by myself!” Calling oneself old is just as prevalent among millennial men as it is among women. Constance, who asked that her last name be withheld, recalled meeting her granddaughter’s new beau for the first time last Thanksgiving. “He was wearing a raggedy maroon cardigan, a bowtie, suspenders, and pants that suggested that he didn’t really understand the purpose of suspenders.” When the boyfriend proclaimed that he was “rockin’ the grandpa swag,” Constance sighed. “I didn’t have the heart to tell my darling granddaughter that her boyfriend looked like a bankrupt magician,” she said…”

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On Campus, Young Veterans Are Learning How to Be Millennials

On Campus, Young Veterans Are Learning How to Be Millennials

“…Arnett agrees: Today’s emerging adults are less motivated less by profit, and more by purpose, than previous generations. This has been misinterpreted as entitlement, he says. “They’re just not willing to work their lifetimes in a job they hate. That’s something admirable about them, not something we should be abusing them for.”..”

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Dear Millennials, We’re Sorry

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June 9, 2014 · 6:06 pm

Millennials Aren’t Millionaires, But We’re Great Philanthropists

millennials, arent, millionaires,, but, were, great, philanthropists,

 

“With no shortage of generation-bashing these days, twentysomethings might be feeling a bit jaded by articles and pundits framing them as “narcissistic,” “materialistic,” and “cheap.” The media and other generations seem to have a lot to say about how millennials spend their time and money, and the intentions behind those actions and purchases.

But the reality is that this generation is redefining the way we think about business. Conscious consumerism is now its own form of philanthropy, and this generation is leading the charge in supporting for-profit models with a moral compass, and looking for more meaningful opportunities to have impact. This carries particular implications for the nonprofit sector as millennials lead the way in increasing the do-gooder appetite and reinventing how we spend our time and money. 

If you have purchased a pair of TOMS shoes or Warby Parker sunglasses, donated to your friends’Kickstarter campaigns, or even went to a concert that benefited charity, then I believe that you are a philanthropist. Etymologically, “philanthropy” means “love for humanity,” and for many that translates into anyone who gives time, money, skills, networking, or even passion toward a cause. This is something the millennial generation inherently weaves into life through our everyday choices. In effect, we are mainstreaming sustainability and purpose into everything from our concert venues to our dining out for a cause. 

For the third year in a row, the Case Foundation partnered with Achieve, a creative fundraising firm and thought leader on nonprofit millennial engagement, to produce the Millennial Impact Report, which surveyed more than 2,500 millennials ages 20 to 35.

We found that 83 percent of respondents gave a financial gift to a cause in 2012. And one of the most interesting findings from the 2013 report is that millennials are cause-driven, preferring to give toward a specific cause that resonates with their interests over writing a check to a specific organization as a whole. Seventy-three percent volunteered for a cause that they were passionate about or felt created impact, and 70 percent of millennials are hitting the (physical and virtual) “pavement,” raising money for their causes both online and offline. Achieve highlights this “supportive activism” as its own heralding cry against the threatening “slacktivist” legacy that many other generations believe millennials are leaving behind.

The report revealed that 80 percent of millennials read nonprofits’ e-mail newsletters, but we like to do it through our smartphones. We will also only read up to five organizations’ newsletters at a given time. This is tough news for nonprofits that need to adjust to the rising demand for quality and ease of information sharing, both through new technology and effective messaging.

Young donors also expressed dislike for being asked for money upfront via social media, newsletters, or through an organization’s website, feeling as though they can offer more to an organization than just money. And as much as millennials want to give, they also need to receive — always searching for professional development opportunities, networking, and skills that can help propel their own successful battle through a tough job market.

Our generation has lived through 9/11, Hurricane Sandy, and the Arab Spring (to name only a few major historical events). The rise of mobile technologies, increased communication, and lighting speed-tweeting prowess has transformed us from standby witnesses to active participants in the world’s current challenges. As a result, we are a socially minded group, tuned in to the issues of our day and primed to give back.

This week, the Millennial Impact Conference will explore these very topics, including the challenges and opportunities nonprofits face to engage and utilize these new “cause evangelists.” Livestreamed for free, the conference will showcase entrepreneurs, philanthropists, corporate leaders, and social activists like Sophia Bush and Jose Antonio Vargas who will weigh in on how and why to connect with the millennial generation. We hope you’ll join us to learn moreon July 18.  

Picture Credit: CNN

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July 23, 2013 · 9:38 pm

Stressed Out Americans Want Help, But Many Don’t Get It

by NANCY SHUTE

February 08, 201310:25 AM

Life as a millennial may not be as mellow as it looks.

iStockphoto.com

 

“Nobody doubts that stress can contribute to health problems, from depression to anxiety to heart attacks.

But you could be forgiven for thinking that folks who take care of other people for a living don’t seem to have fully absorbed the message.

More than half of Americans say they get little or no help managing stress from their providers of health care, according to the annual Stress in America survey from the American Psychological Association. The group surveys about 2,000 adults across the country each year.

The latest findings square with other studies that find a quarter of Americans don’t have access to mental health care.

People who weren’t getting that kind of help were more likely to say that life got more stressful in the past year.

The docs did a little better with discussing lifestyle and behavior changes that would improve health, with 61 percent of people saying they got help with that.

Still, those numbers suggest that a lot of people are walking out of the doctor’s office just as stressed out as they were when they arrived.

The nation’s overall stress index declined a bit in 2012, to 4.9 on a 10-point scale, after several years of recession-fueled angst.

But people in their 20s aren’t feeling very relaxed. The millennial generation rates their stress levels higher than any other age group in the new survey. Considering that unemployment in 20-somethings is running 13 percent, compared to 8 percent for the population overall, they’ve got that one right.

“When we asked young people what caused them stress, about 75 percent talk about work and money,” says Norman Anderson, who is CEO of the American Psychological Association.

And it looks like they could really use some good medical advice on stress management. “The millennials are saying, ‘Yes, we’d like to get more help with managing stress, we’d like to get more help with living a health lifestyle, we’d like to get more help with mental health, but we’re not getting it,’ ” Anderson told Shots.

Millennials say they’re turning to food and video games to chill, with 36 percent chowing down, compared to 25 percent of all adults, and 41 percent firing up the game console.

Maybe a dog would help? Last year, researchers said that people who took their dogs to work had lower stress hormones than dogless workers.

No word on if the dog thing works if you don’t have a job.”

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February 11, 2013 · 5:11 pm